CrossFit Terminology

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Matt Pedri  -  

CrossFit Acronyms and Abbreviations

  • AMRAP: As Many Reps (sometimes Rounds)as Possible
  • ATG: Ass to Grass
  • BP: Bench press
  • BS: Back squat
  • BW (or BWT): Body weight
  • CFT:CrossFit Total – consisting of max squat, press, and deadlift.
  • CFSB: CrossFit Strength Bias. A program developed by Jeff Martin and Darrell White, explained here. You’ll need a CFJ subscription.
  • CFWU:CrossFit Warm-up
  • CLN: Clean
  • C&J: Clean and jerk
  • C2: Concept II rowing machine
  • DL: Deadlift
  • FS: Front squat
  • GHR(D): Glute ham raise (developer). Posterior chain exercise, like a back extension. Also, the device that allows for the proper performance of a GHR.
  • GHR(D) Situp: Situp done on the GHR(D) bench.
  • GPP: General physical preparedness, aka “fitness.”
  • GTG: Grease the Groove, a protocol of doing many sub-maximal sets of an exercise throughtout the day
  • H2H: Hand to hand; refers to Jeff Martone’s kettlebell “juggling” techniques (or to combat).
  • HSPU: Hand stand push up. Kick up into a handstand (use wall for balance, if needed) bend arms until nose touches floor and push back up.
  • HSQ: Hang squat (clean or snatch). Start with bar “at the hang,” about knee height. Initiate pull. As the bar rises drop into a full squat and catch the bar in the racked position. From there, rise to a standing position
  • IF: Intermittent Fasting
  • KB: Kettlebell
  • MEBBMaximum Effort Black box, term coined by Mike Rutherford. Search the forum for it. Originally laid out in one of the early Performance Menu issues.
  • KTE: Knees to elbows. Similar to TTBs described below.
  • MetCon: Metabolic Conditioning workout
  • MP: Military press
  • MU: Muscle ups. Hanging from rings you do a combination pull-up and dip so you end in an upright support.
  • OHS: Overhead squat. Full-depth squat performed while arms are locked out in a wide grip press position above (and usually behind) the head.
  • PC: Power clean
  • Pd: Pood, weight measure for kettlebells
  • PR: Personal record
  • PP: Push press
  • PSN: Power snatch
  • PU: Pull-ups, possibly push ups depending on the context
  • Rep: Repetition. One performance of an exercise.
  • Rx’d; as Rx’d: As prescribed; as written. WOD done without any adjustments.
  • RM: Repetition maximum. Your 1RM is your max lift for one rep. Your 10 RM is the most you can lift 10 times.
  • SDHP: Sumo deadlift high pull (see exercise section)
  • Set: A number of repetitions. e.g., 3 sets of 10 reps, often seen as 3×10, means do 10 reps, rest, repeat, rest, repeat.
  • SPP: Specific physical preparednesss, aka skill training.
  • SN: Snatch
  • SQ: Squat
  • SS: Starting Strength; Mark Rippetoe’s great book on strength training basics. Available right here.
  • Subbed: Substituted. The CORRECT use of “subbed,” as in “substituted,” is, “I subbed an exercise I can do for one I can’t,” For example,if you can’t do HSPU, you subbed regular pushups.
    Sadly, many illiterate posters get this bass-ackward, and claim that since they can’t do HSPU, they subbed HSPU for pushups. D’oh!
  • TGU: Turkish get-up (See exercise section)
  • TTB: Toes to bar. Hang from bar. Bending only at waist raise your toes to touch the bar, slowly lower them and repeat.
  • WO, sometimes W/O: Workout
  • WOD: Workout of the day
  • YBF: You’ll Be Fine (liberally applied in spray form)

What Is CrossFit?

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Matt Pedri  -  

CrossFit is a way to get fit, fast. If you want to be stronger, faster, have better endurance, look good naked…it’s the way to go.

CrossFit is by design broad, general and inclusive. Its specialty is in not specializing, and its workouts elicit a maximal neuro-endocrine response from your body by taxing your body to its core with variety, intensity, and multiple joint, full body, functional movements. As our friends at CrossFit North say of the workout of the day, “It should CRUSH YOU.”  

Origin & Methodology

CrossFit is a fitness and conditioning system developed by Coach Greg Glassman through many years of watching, working with, and coaching all types of people – from those considered “normal and average”, to top athletes. Coach Glassman’s idea – take what worked best from the sports and movements that create the most versatile athletes (gymnastics and weightlifting), and throw the rest out. Actually, the system really created itself – if a workout or an exercise proved functional and got great results (IE- challenged you to the bone), it stayed in the system. If not, well, you got the picture. CrossFit is what remains – bar none, the most effective fitness and conditioning system in the world!

Who’s This For?

One of the things that makes CrossFit unique is that it addresses the fact that the fitness needs of an “Average Joe” are identical to that of a top athlete – the only difference being intensity (speed & weight) and volume. In all cases, the best results come when training included functional movement (that which replicates real life movement), at high intensity and with constant variety. Any exercise program that meets these three criteria can be considered “CrossFit,” from shoveling dirt, hauling rocks and cutting down trees to weightlifting, pull ups and sprinting.

The Sport of Fitness

CrossFit has been called “The Sport of Fitness” because it re-introduces personal athletic achievement and performance to training. The mindset at the start of each workout is to be stronger, move faster, more efficiently, with better form than ever. This is why even after years of training CrossFit style, scores and times in workouts continue to drop and athletes continue to improve. Its hard, fun, exciting, challenging, and will push you to be your absolute best!

Why CrossFit?

Results. Period. To gain a greater understanding of CrossFit, [click here] to download the free trial issue of the CrossFit Journal. Once you’ve read this, you’ll understand that most other training programs either take way too much time to get the results or are incomplete, leaving a well rounded athlete with a chink in his/her armor. If you do have specific needs (football, rugby, baseball, volleyball, etc) the instructors at CrossFit Davis can help you with that as well. Just let us know.

What’s the CrossFit Difference?

In gyms and health clubs throughout the world the typical workout consists of isolation movements and extended aerobic sessions. The fitness community from trainers to the magazines has the exercising public believing that lateral raises, curls, leg extensions, sit-ups and the like combined with 20-40 minute stints on the stationary bike or treadmill are going to lead to some kind of great fitness. Well, at CrossFit we work exclusively with compound movements and shorter high intensity cardiovascular sessions. We’ve replaced the lateral raise with push-press, the curl with pull-ups, and the leg extension with squats. For every long distance effort our athletes will do five or six at short distance.
Why? Because compound or functional movements and high intensity or anaerobic cardio is radically more effective at eliciting nearly any desired fitness result. Startlingly, this is not a matter of opinion but solid irrefutable scientific fact and yet the marginally effective old ways persist and are nearly universal. Our approach is consistent with what is practiced in elite training programs associated with major university athletic teams and professional sports. CrossFit endeavors to bring state-of-the-art coaching techniques to the general public and athlete who haven’t access to current technologies, research, and coaching methods.